Thanks Mrs. Schmidt and 5th Grade Friends

Here is an excerpt from an article about The Alabaster Box. Mrs. Katie Schmidt and her fifth grade class at Rodgers Forge Elementary School in Baltimore have read the book and given me helpful feedback. It all started when my daughter had a parent-teacher conference. Mrs. Schmidt pointed out that Amelia (my granddaughter) has a great sense of story. My daughter, Liesl, told her about the book. I consider Amelia my Junior Editor.

When they finished reading the book, I visited the class to talk about the experience of writing. The visit was on Read Across America Day.  The article appeared in The Baltimore Sun and The Towson Times:

By Rachael Pacella, Towson Times, March 3, 2017 2:26 PM

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“Frances Schoonmaker has found a unique focus group to test-read the first in a series of adolescent novels she has written and would like to see published — a classroom full of fifth grade students at the neighborhood elementary school.

“For the past month and a half, students in Katie Schmidt’s 5th-grade class at Rodgers Forge Elementary School — including Schoonmaker’s granddaughter, Amelia — have listened as Schmidt has read to them each day from the first book in a series of three written by the retired professor and teacher. “The Alabaster Box” is a story set in the 1840s, just prior to the country’s gold rush, which tells the story of an 11-year-old girl who  opens a magical box and must deal with the consequences.”

Follow the link to read the  article.  (Copyright © 2017, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing and Reading THE ALABASTER BOX: An Invitation

Chapter 1: The Stokes Company

            “If it had been left up to Grace, they would have stayed home. But she didn’t get to choose. With land opening up in the West, her father and mother wanted go to California and start a medical school. So, sorry or not, she had to leave nearly everybody and everything she had ever known and loved in St. Louis, Missouri where she had lived her whole safe, comfortable life.”

This is the opening paragraph of The Alabaster Box.  Maybe you have a question for me. You may ask questions about the story or about writing the story. I’ll do my best to answer. You can also tell me what you liked and wanted more of as well as what didn’t work for you. You will see some comments below. You can enter your own comments or respond to somebody else’s comment. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you will find the place to reply.

If you haven’t read the book, I hope this makes you curious enough to want to read it when it is published.