What do cats have to do with it?

This is Butterfly. She is looking at me resentfully. I am spending too much time getting ready for launching THE BLACK ALABASTER BOX and not enough time with her. When she thinks that I have been working too long, she comes and sits, looking at me with this look. If I ignore her, she comes up to me, wraps her legs around my leg as if she is wants to make sure I don’t escape from her commanding presence, and meows. It is a kind of chirp meow–I don’t have words for it. It’s persuasive, though.

There is another possibility for the look today. Maybe she resents Old Shep. Maybe she is saying, “Seriously, a DOG?”
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What’s in a Launch?

thumbnailWhat’s in a book launch? I’m getting ready for THE BLACK ALABASTER BOX Book Launch on April 5th so I’m thinking about it a lot. I think about launching a rocket—will it fly? I think about launching a boat—do we break a bottle of champagne over the book or over me? Children are invited, maybe no breaking of bottles!

I’ve read about other people’s book launches. A launch is about getting the word out. It is about selling books, marketing. But it is more than that for me. It is a celebration of girls and boys getting their hands on the book and liking it. It is a celebration of the many, many adults who have contacted me to say how much they like it. (That is a bonus. I’m glad for adults to enjoy it too.)

As an elementary school teacher, I always read children’s books along with my class. A good children’s book is a good book for anyone. Some of my best book recommendations have come from kids. For example, I remember when Jimmy put THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH by Norton Juster on my desk.“Mrs. B. You have to read this!” (That’s not a type-o, Bolin was my married name.) A few minutes later he came over to where I was working with some other kids. “No, I mean you HAVE to read this.” I made it my business to begin reading it that night. Jimmy was right. What a great read.

When I was teaching elementary school, children loaned me books, gave me books, told me about books. I was always looking for children’s books to share with them, too. I’m still reading children’s books. I know how important books can be for children. So it was pretty thrilling when Isaiah, the first child outside the family to read a draft of THE BLACK ALABASTER BOX for me, said, “I really like your book!”

It was pretty thrilling when feedback came from the pilot classes, too. Students in Katie Schmidt’s public school class in Baltimore and Jon Dunlap’s independent school class in Arlington wrote to tell me how much they enjoyed it. Those were great moments. Now, as I prepare for a launch, I’m celebrating them. I’m celebrating the book being out at last, thanks to my publisher Dr. Shrikrishna “Krish” Singh at Auctus Publishing. I’m celebrating Liesl Bolin’s tireless effort in taking photographs, designing the cover, getting the word out. I’m celebrating all the people who have kindly posted on my Facebook page, shared the book on their Facebook pages, written reviews on line, or Tweeted about it to friends.

It takes a team to launch a rocket, or a ship, or a book.

first Amazon review! yea!

And Five Star, Yea!

I live in the Texas Panhandle, and I’ve always loved history, so this book is right up my alley. I am 63 not really the age that this was geared toward, but I absolutely loved the whole story. What a great way to teach some history and geography all wrapped up in a story that takes one along on a journey that has elements of Spirituality, Fantasy and adventure! I highly recommend this book for all ages. Odie

 

 

The Black Alabaster Box is Ready!

Cover photoGood news! The Black Alabaster Box is now available in paperback, hard cover, and e-book. You can find it at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. I-Book, through Apple.

Here is the cover. The photograph and design is by Liesl Bolin. You can find out more about it on my web page. Like me on Facebook. Follow me on Twitter @fgschoonmaker

Life on the Oregon Trail?

When I taught fourth grade in Portland Oregon–that was back when dinosaurs roamed the earth–we had a unit on Westward Expansion. A lot of schools teach about pioneers settling the West in fourth, fifth or sixth grade. We used Mary Jane Carr’s Children of the Covered Wagon as a read-aloud. It was a good match for the unit. (If you haven’t read it, you can still find it in some libraries. I recently tracked down an old copy on line.)

Our understanding of the perspective of Native American People has changed since the book was written. But Carr is remarkably free of some of the errors to be found in social studies and history books of a few decades ago.

I thought it would be fun to form an imaginary wagon train going West. We could mark our progress on the Oregon Trail as we read the book. And we could tie our study in with English and language arts by keeping journals where we made up events that happened to us along the way. Everybody had to make up an identity and stick with it for the trip West.

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A Thousand Wagon Trains Head West

We had a whole wagon train full of single people. No way anybody was going to admit they’d want to be married, especially with somebody else in the class! Being married and having a family was too great a stretch of the imagination.

A lot of the girls were going West to be school teachers or doctors. Some were adventurers. Boys were going to be doctors, farmers, cowboys, or set up a business.

The journals were hardest. A typical journal entry was, “Not much happened today. Just more grass and hills to look at,” or heroic descriptions of battles with Native Tribes. We had to put a limit to attacks by Native People—especially since huge stretches passed through country that was not well populated.  Even then, we knew that attacks were few and far between. And we had to decide what rivers we were going to cross and when or how many times you could step on a rattlesnake and still live.  Unfortunately, we didn’t have some of the wonderful websites available today to help us understand life on the trail.

It was a lot of fun in spite of all our difficulties. We learned a lot about writing, imagination, plausibility and some of the grimmer realities of life on the trail. As hard as it was making up interesting things to happen along the way, I think we all agreed we got off easy. We didn’t have nearly as much to deal with as those who followed wagon trails to Oregon, Washington, and California!

All this is to say that I was really delighted when Jon Dunlap, fourth-fifth grade teacher at Rivendell School, Arlington, Virginia wanted to read The Alabaster Box to his class this spring. I’ll have more to say about that next post.

What Do Writers Do?

Writers write. Right? Wrong. Maybe wrong is too strong.

Writers do write. But that isn’t all they do. They also work on their craft. They meet with other writers and talk about their work. They share ideas about writing. They take workshops and go to conferences to help them learn more about writing.

When you study writing at school, you write. But you probably spend some time conferring with a writing partner or a small group. That way you get feedback on your ideas and on your first draft. Then you revise. Maybe you get a new idea and add it. Experienced writers do these things too.

They also work on getting their work published. At school, publishing is often creation of a magazine or your own collection of stories. Maybe your teacher has stories all put together and bound into a book for parents. You celebrate what you have done.

Experienced writers want to publish, too. They’d like their books to be in the bookstore or on-line. Working to get your work published is also part of your craft as a writer.

Sometimes writers know how to write, but they don’t know what to do about getting their work published and on the shelves of bookstores. They aren’t always sure about how to let people know that they have a great book that they want to share.

I went to an all-day meeting for writers on Saturday, the Kansas City Writer’s Conference. I chose this conference for three reasons. 1) The conference description sounded like it would give me some good information about getting my work published, 2) The Alabaster Box starts out in Kansas City, Missouri* I like to stay in touch with the Kansas City area*. 3) My brother lives in Lawrence, Kansas, less than an hour away. I wanted to  visit him for a few days and attend the one-day conference.

In fact, my brother drove me into Kansas City yesterday. We left early. It was a cold, foggy morning. I was glad to have him do the driving. I looked out over soggy fields and bright green pasture lands where cows were grazing. I remembered that long ago all the countryside was unfenced prairie. If I had been traveling to Kansas City then, I might have followed the Sante Fe Trail. I would have been on horseback or in a wagon. That is what the land looked like when Grace Willis went west with her family.

I spent the whole day learning new things and telling people about my book. The guest teacher was Marisa A. Corvisiero. She is a literary agent who founded the Corvisiero Literary Agency. She told us about things that good writers do, how to work with an agent, and many things a writer needs to know in order to get published. Her talks were interesting and lively.

Good writers write. Right. And they work on their craft.

*If you follow the Kansas City area link you can find out some fun facts about Kansas. There is even a link that lets you hear cattle sounds. If you follow the Missouri link you will find fun facts about the state of Missouri. There are some interesting things about Kansas City, Missouri, too.

 

 

 

 

 

Reviews that count

When I began work on The Alabaster Box my granddaughter, Amelia, was of enormous help. I tried chapters out on her and we talked through issues. It was like having a junior editor. I asked friends, Isaiah and his mother, Sarah VanTiem, if they would kindly read it once I had a good draft. Isaiah is a fourth grade student and I figured that if anybody could give me objective feedback, he could. Sarah is a poet and has a critical eye–just what I needed. When Isaiah said, “I really like your book,” when I saw him a week or two later, I was really pleased.

The next big trial came when Katie Schmidt read it to her fifth grade class at a public school. It was interesting to get feedback via Amelia as they progressed through it. They had good ideas, but best of all, they LIKED it–really LIKED it! It doesn’t get any better than that.

All this time while I am searching for an agent and not getting any enthusiasm, the kids are liking the book and wanting more. It was just the encouragement I needed. Somewhere out there is the sensible agent and publisher who will jump at the chance to support the book, because the kids already do. I got some wonderful thank you letters after I visited the class.  The boys and girls in Mrs. Schmidt’s class are the ones who should be getting the thank you. Below are some of their letters:   Letters for Blog2Okay, so you can’t see them that well. Zach says thanks for “letting us borrow your awesome book, ‘The Alabaster Box.’ Now I want to read the whole trilogy!”–even if I haven’t found a publisher by the time you finish The Red Abalone Shell, Zach, I’ll be sure you get the final book. It takes a long time to get a book into print. You shouldn’t have to wait that long.

Owen and Fisher say they hope the books get published–me too! Owen wrote, “Your first book was great and [I’ll] bet the second book and the third are even better.” Colin M. says, “your book held great things like the suspense, the adventure, and the excitement.” Sam says that the book, “got me more inspired to read more books this year.” That’s good, Sam. The world is full of wonderful books just waiting to be read.

Abby and Maddy both say they can’t wait to read my next books. Yea Abby and Maddy. That makes me feel great. Mary, who wasn’t one of the four who drew the chance to read one of the four manuscripts of The Red Abalone Shell that I left with the class, says that she can’t read it yet, “but I’m very excited to because I LOVED the first book.” So I hope you’ll like the second, Mary.

Colin K thought it was interesting and funny. Malena said that since a lot of students really liked The Alabaster Box it was nice for me to leave copies of the next book. I hope you like it Malena when you get to read it. Natasha says, “I really enjoyed your book and I thought it was AMAZING, I will definitely try to start reading the next one!”  I hope your turn comes soon, Natasha.

Caroline, who was one of the four who drew first chance to read The Red Abalone Shell says, “I love the second book so far it is really good!” Eve says, “I am so EXCITED to read the new book!! I can’t wait to figure out what is going to happen to James and Little Grace…I LOVED the first book a whole lot so you can imagine how exited I am to get to read one of the books.” [One of the four copies I left.]  Elise, who was also one of the four, says, “So far, The Red Abalone Shell is awesome! I also like The Alabaster Box! Caroline, Eve, and Elise, I’ll be very interested to hear your ideas as you finish the book.

From these excerpts, maybe you can see why I call this post “Reviews that count.” I treasure the excitement these girls and boys shared with me. But I also treasured their feedback. I took what they had to say very seriously.